Upcoming Events
6:30 p.m.
"Halloween: Celestial Origins"What do you associate with Halloween? Trick-or-Treating, costumes… astronomy? After all, Halloween is an astronomical holiday! During this program you will learn the history of Halloween and how it fits into the seasons as a “cross-quarter day.” We will also explore the night sky and learn what planets, constellations, and stars will be out on your Halloween evening.
3:30 p.m.
"Earth, Moon & Sun"Coyote has many misconceptions about our home planet and its most familiar neighbors. His confusion about the universe makes viewers think about how Earth, Moon and Sun work together as a system and learn to distinguish between myths and science. Learn the basics of fusion and solar energy and why the Sun rises and sets.
5 p.m.
There will be a total eclipse of the Sun visible from Muncie, Indiana in just two years. A total solar eclipse is such a spectacular event, it is never too early to start planning for one. Come learn how solar and lunar eclipses happen, and about scientific discoveries that have been supported by total solar eclipses. This show also uses beautiful visuals to explore the historical and cultural view of eclipses, and explains how to safely see these awe-inspiring sights.​​
6:30 p.m.
"Halloween: Celestial Origins"What do you associate with Halloween? Trick-or-Treating, costumes… astronomy? After all, Halloween is an astronomical holiday! During this program you will learn the history of Halloween and how it fits into the seasons as a “cross-quarter day.” We will also explore the night sky and learn what planets, constellations, and stars will be out on your Halloween evening.
3:30 p.m.
Dr. Kim Arcand standing inside an observatory with a large red telescope behind her. Image by Stacey Doyle.Join us live on YouTube on October 13, 2022 at 3:30pm ET with Dr. Kim Arcand, a leading expert in astronomy visualization and a pioneer in 3D imaging, printing, and extended reality applications with astrophysics data.
6 p.m.
In honor of award-winning writer and physicist Dr. Janna Levin’s visit to Ball State University for her talk in Sursa Hall on October 20 at 7:30 p.m., a team of faculty and staff invited Ball State students to submit original pieces of art, poetry, short writings, film and music that celebrates the Webb telescope and team, and the human propensity to ask deep, difficult questions while gazing at the stars. Pieces were chosen by a team of faculty and students to be performed at the Charles W. Brown Planetarium during this unique event on Oct. 19. The performance will be followed by a Q&A with Dr. Levin about her career and efforts to bridge the perceived gaps between art and science. Have an idea to pitch? Do so at http://bit.ly/dome-party-pitch
6:30 p.m.
"Halloween: Celestial Origins"What do you associate with Halloween? Trick-or-Treating, costumes… astronomy? After all, Halloween is an astronomical holiday! During this program you will learn the history of Halloween and how it fits into the seasons as a “cross-quarter day.” We will also explore the night sky and learn what planets, constellations, and stars will be out on your Halloween evening.
3:30 p.m.
"Earth, Moon & Sun"Coyote has many misconceptions about our home planet and its most familiar neighbors. His confusion about the universe makes viewers think about how Earth, Moon and Sun work together as a system and learn to distinguish between myths and science. Learn the basics of fusion and solar energy and why the Sun rises and sets.
5 p.m.
There will be a total eclipse of the Sun visible from Muncie, Indiana in just two years. A total solar eclipse is such a spectacular event, it is never too early to start planning for one. Come learn how solar and lunar eclipses happen, and about scientific discoveries that have been supported by total solar eclipses. This show also uses beautiful visuals to explore the historical and cultural view of eclipses, and explains how to safely see these awe-inspiring sights.​​
6:30 p.m.
"Halloween: Celestial Origins"What do you associate with Halloween? Trick-or-Treating, costumes… astronomy? After all, Halloween is an astronomical holiday! During this program you will learn the history of Halloween and how it fits into the seasons as a “cross-quarter day.” We will also explore the night sky and learn what planets, constellations, and stars will be out on your Halloween evening.
6:30 p.m.
Astronomy Slam Poster 2022, Text over JWST Carina Nebula from NASA, Cost $4, Seating LimitedThe Charles W. Brown Planetarium presents the 3rd Annual Astronomy SLAM! Just 10 minutes a person – that is all the time Ball State students will get to share a piece of our universe with you in the Brown Planetarium. During this event, students will use planetarium visuals to help them present in the most creative way they can while competing for the title of Astronomy Slam Champion! Purchase tickets at https://commerce.cashnet.com/BALL_EMS114
3 a.m.
We encourage you to look towards the skies during the early morning of November 8 to see a total lunar eclipse in the Western Hemisphere — weather permitting. The enchanting show will begin at 3:02 a.m. on November 8, with the famous "Blood Moon" or "totality" portion of the eclipse beginning at 5:16 a.m. The Moon will remain in totality until 6:41 a.m., when it will then go into a partial eclipse until the event comes to an end after the Moon has set below the horizon.
6:30 p.m.
"Solar Superstorms"A fury is building on the surface of the Sun… high-velocity jets, a fiery tsunami wave that reaches 100,000km high, and rising loops of electrified gas are energized by what is going on underneath its surface. Will these “storms” affect Earth? Find the answer as we venture into the seething interior of our star to learn how they are formed. Solar Superstorms takes viewers into the tangle of magnetic fields and superhot plasma that vent the Sun’s rage in dramatic flares, violent solar tornadoes, and the largest eruptions in the solar system: Coronal Mass Ejections.
3:30 p.m.
"Astronaut"The exploration of space is the greatest endeavor that humankind has ever undertaken. What does it take to be part of this incredible journey? What does it take to become an astronaut? Experience a rocket launch from inside the body of an astronaut, explore the amazing worlds of inner and outer space, and discover the perils that lurk in space as we subject Chad, our test astronaut, to everything space has to throw at him. Narrated by Ewan McGregor.
5 p.m.
"SEEING!"Narrated by Neil deGrasse Tyson, “SEEING!” follows a photon’s creation and journey across the galaxy to a young stargazer’s eye where we learn about anatomy more than astronomy. The viewer follows the photon into the girl’s eye, learning the structures of the eye and their functions, prior to taking a ride on the optic nerve.
6:30 p.m.
"Solar Superstorms"A fury is building on the surface of the Sun… high-velocity jets, a fiery tsunami wave that reaches 100,000km high, and rising loops of electrified gas are energized by what is going on underneath its surface. Will these “storms” affect Earth? Find the answer as we venture into the seething interior of our star to learn how they are formed. Solar Superstorms takes viewers into the tangle of magnetic fields and superhot plasma that vent the Sun’s rage in dramatic flares, violent solar tornadoes, and the largest eruptions in the solar system: Coronal Mass Ejections.
6:30 p.m.
"Solar Superstorms"A fury is building on the surface of the Sun… high-velocity jets, a fiery tsunami wave that reaches 100,000km high, and rising loops of electrified gas are energized by what is going on underneath its surface. Will these “storms” affect Earth? Find the answer as we venture into the seething interior of our star to learn how they are formed. Solar Superstorms takes viewers into the tangle of magnetic fields and superhot plasma that vent the Sun’s rage in dramatic flares, violent solar tornadoes, and the largest eruptions in the solar system: Coronal Mass Ejections.
3:30 p.m.
"Astronaut"The exploration of space is the greatest endeavor that humankind has ever undertaken. What does it take to be part of this incredible journey? What does it take to become an astronaut? Experience a rocket launch from inside the body of an astronaut, explore the amazing worlds of inner and outer space, and discover the perils that lurk in space as we subject Chad, our test astronaut, to everything space has to throw at him. Narrated by Ewan McGregor.
5 p.m.
"SEEING!"Narrated by Neil deGrasse Tyson, “SEEING!” follows a photon’s creation and journey across the galaxy to a young stargazer’s eye where we learn about anatomy more than astronomy. The viewer follows the photon into the girl’s eye, learning the structures of the eye and their functions, prior to taking a ride on the optic nerve.
6:30 p.m.
"Solar Superstorms"A fury is building on the surface of the Sun… high-velocity jets, a fiery tsunami wave that reaches 100,000km high, and rising loops of electrified gas are energized by what is going on underneath its surface. Will these “storms” affect Earth? Find the answer as we venture into the seething interior of our star to learn how they are formed. Solar Superstorms takes viewers into the tangle of magnetic fields and superhot plasma that vent the Sun’s rage in dramatic flares, violent solar tornadoes, and the largest eruptions in the solar system: Coronal Mass Ejections.
6:30 p.m.
"The Christmas Star"Over the years many people have tried to explain the appearance of the Star of Bethlehem, as described in the Bible. Can the star be explained as an exploding star, a comet, or some other natural event in the sky? Potential natural explanations for the Star of Bethlehem and common modern-day misconceptions will be discussed.
3:30 p.m.
"The Solar System"Stay warm inside with your young learners while visiting some of the coldest places in our Solar System. Come explore the many objects of the Solar System, including the Sun, all the major planets, the asteroids, and Pluto during this live presentation for kids.
5 p.m.
Narrated by David Tennant, we explore what exactly astronomers do in this new program. Today’s astronomer is not the lone observer of past centuries. This program reveals the global collaboration, technology, and dedication required to answer the unresolved questions of the Universe and features info on NASA’s recently-launched James Webb Space Telescope.
6:30 p.m.
"The Christmas Star"Over the years many people have tried to explain the appearance of the Star of Bethlehem, as described in the Bible. Can the star be explained as an exploding star, a comet, or some other natural event in the sky? Potential natural explanations for the Star of Bethlehem and common modern-day misconceptions will be discussed.
6:30 p.m.
"The Christmas Star"Over the years many people have tried to explain the appearance of the Star of Bethlehem, as described in the Bible. Can the star be explained as an exploding star, a comet, or some other natural event in the sky? Potential natural explanations for the Star of Bethlehem and common modern-day misconceptions will be discussed.
3:30 p.m.
"The Solar System"Stay warm inside with your young learners while visiting some of the coldest places in our Solar System. Come explore the many objects of the Solar System, including the Sun, all the major planets, the asteroids, and Pluto during this live presentation for kids.
5 p.m.
Narrated by David Tennant, we explore what exactly astronomers do in this new program. Today’s astronomer is not the lone observer of past centuries. This program reveals the global collaboration, technology, and dedication required to answer the unresolved questions of the Universe and features info on NASA’s recently-launched James Webb Space Telescope.
6:30 p.m.
"The Christmas Star"Over the years many people have tried to explain the appearance of the Star of Bethlehem, as described in the Bible. Can the star be explained as an exploding star, a comet, or some other natural event in the sky? Potential natural explanations for the Star of Bethlehem and common modern-day misconceptions will be discussed.
11:41 a.m.
An annular solar eclipse will occur during the day on October 14, 2023 — and will be visible by only some of the world (weather permitting, with proper eye protection). In Muncie, IN, you will not be able to see the full annular event but rather a partial solar eclipse (weather permitting, given proper eye protection). The partial eclipse will begin on Saturday, October 14, 2023 at 11:41 a.m. when the Moon starts to block out the northwest side of the Sun (at the 2 o'clock mark). The Moon will continue to block out more of the Sun until maximum occurs at 1:03 p.m. The partial solar eclipse will then end at 2:28 p.m.
1:52 p.m.
A total solar eclipse will occur during the day on April 8, 2024 and will only be visible by only some of the world, including Muncie, IN (weather permitting, with proper eye protection)! The solar eclipse will begin on Monday, April 8, 2024 at 1:52 p.m., when the Moon starts to block out the southwest side of the Sun (at the 5 o'clock mark). The Moon will continue to block out more of the Sun until totality, when the Sun is fully blocked by the Moon. Totality in Muncie begins at 3:07:34 p.m. You can safely view this portion of the eclipse, and this short portion alone, without any eye protection because the entire face of the Sun will be completely blocked by the Moon. Here in Muncie, IN, totality will last 3 minutes and 48 seconds, with it ending at 3:11:22 p.m. The partial solar eclipse will continue until the entire event ends at 4:24 p.m.