Upcoming Events
7 p.m.
Presented by Chris Flook. To celebrate BSU's centennial anniversary, the Department of Telecommunications produced two documentaries and a PSA campaign to honor the centennial.
8:30 a.m.
Bruce GeelhoedThe faculty of the Department of History host the Annual Student History Conference each year at the L.A. Pittenger Student Center. Dr. Bruce Geelhoed, Professor of History at Ball State University, will deliver the conference's keynote address.
6:30 p.m.
To Space and BackSpace exploration, our greatest adventure, is having a big impact on our lives. "To Space & Back" takes audiences on an incredible journey from the far reaches of our known universe to our own planet. It is an extraordinary story of human ingenuity and engineering, describing how the technology that transports us through space is paving the way for the devices and apps we use every day.
8 p.m.
To Space and BackSpace exploration, our greatest adventure, is having a big impact on our lives. "To Space & Back" takes audiences on an incredible journey from the far reaches of our known universe to our own planet. It is an extraordinary story of human ingenuity and engineering, describing how the technology that transports us through space is paving the way for the devices and apps we use every day.
2 p.m.
Lori Rader-DayIndiana native and Ball State graduate Lori Rader-Day will be visiting campus on February 25, 2019 to talk about writing and quitting your day job.
6:30 p.m.
To Space and BackSpace exploration, our greatest adventure, is having a big impact on our lives. "To Space & Back" takes audiences on an incredible journey from the far reaches of our known universe to our own planet. It is an extraordinary story of human ingenuity and engineering, describing how the technology that transports us through space is paving the way for the devices and apps we use every day.
8 p.m.
To Space and BackSpace exploration, our greatest adventure, is having a big impact on our lives. "To Space & Back" takes audiences on an incredible journey from the far reaches of our known universe to our own planet. It is an extraordinary story of human ingenuity and engineering, describing how the technology that transports us through space is paving the way for the devices and apps we use every day.
7 p.m.
Image for The Real Universe in Real TimeCome to the Charles W. Brown Planetarium and watch as Ball State University astronomers and their students obtain deep-sky images with extremely light-sensitive cameras on telescopes located at dark sites in Arizona, South America and the Canary Islands. These telescopes span 7 time zones and give access to the Southern Hemisphere sky that is not visible from Indiana. BSU is part of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) that operates these research instruments through the Internet. You will see star clusters, nebulae and galaxies in real time and reach distances of millions of light years! The planetarium star projector will show you where these objects are located in the night sky – even the sky as seen in Chile or the Canary Islands. Join us for this truly unique event. This may be the first time a live-sky event of this scale has been done by any planetarium anywhere!
9 p.m.
Image for The Real Universe in Real TimeCome to the Charles W. Brown Planetarium and watch as Ball State University astronomers and their students obtain deep-sky images with extremely light-sensitive cameras on telescopes located at dark sites in Arizona, South America and the Canary Islands. These telescopes span 7 time zones and give access to the Southern Hemisphere sky that is not visible from Indiana. BSU is part of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) that operates these research instruments through the Internet. You will see star clusters, nebulae and galaxies in real time and reach distances of millions of light years! The planetarium star projector will show you where these objects are located in the night sky – even the sky as seen in Chile or the Canary Islands. Join us for this truly unique event. This may be the first time a live-sky event of this scale has been done by any planetarium anywhere!
6:30 p.m.
From Earth to the Universe - Planetarium Show"From Earth to the Universe" leaves our home to take the audience out to the colorful birthplaces and burial grounds of stars, and still further out, beyond the Milky Way, to the unimaginable immensity of a myriad galaxies. Viewers can revel in the splendor of the various worlds in the Solar System and the ferocity of the scorching Sun. Along the way, the audience will learn about the history of astronomy, the invention of the telescope, and today’s giant telescopes that allow us continue to probe ever deeper into the Universe.
8 p.m.
From Earth to the Universe - Planetarium Show"From Earth to the Universe" leaves our home to take the audience out to the colorful birthplaces and burial grounds of stars, and still further out, beyond the Milky Way, to the unimaginable immensity of a myriad galaxies. Viewers can revel in the splendor of the various worlds in the Solar System and the ferocity of the scorching Sun. Along the way, the audience will learn about the history of astronomy, the invention of the telescope, and today’s giant telescopes that allow us continue to probe ever deeper into the Universe.
6:30 p.m.
Stars to Steer By IconMany humanities majors express a desire to “get into publishing,” but it’s hard to know how. Three recent alumni who work in publishing will share their career journey. Two of the panelists work in publishing in Indiana, and they’ll be attending in person. The third works in New York and will be attending via Skype.
4:30 p.m.
Take 3 Department Lecture Series icon featuring Jeff Spanke, Angela Jackson-Brown, Brianna MaukTake 3 is designed to showcase faculty from various subareas of the Department of English in presentations all can attend. Both tenure line and contract faculty are always represented. This semester the presenters are Angela Jackson-Brown, Brianna Mauk, and Jeff Spanke.
6:30 p.m.
From Earth to the Universe - Planetarium Show"From Earth to the Universe" leaves our home to take the audience out to the colorful birthplaces and burial grounds of stars, and still further out, beyond the Milky Way, to the unimaginable immensity of a myriad galaxies. Viewers can revel in the splendor of the various worlds in the Solar System and the ferocity of the scorching Sun. Along the way, the audience will learn about the history of astronomy, the invention of the telescope, and today’s giant telescopes that allow us continue to probe ever deeper into the Universe.
8 p.m.
From Earth to the Universe - Planetarium Show"From Earth to the Universe" leaves our home to take the audience out to the colorful birthplaces and burial grounds of stars, and still further out, beyond the Milky Way, to the unimaginable immensity of a myriad galaxies. Viewers can revel in the splendor of the various worlds in the Solar System and the ferocity of the scorching Sun. Along the way, the audience will learn about the history of astronomy, the invention of the telescope, and today’s giant telescopes that allow us continue to probe ever deeper into the Universe.
7:30 p.m.
Image for The Real Universe in Real TimeCome to the Charles W. Brown Planetarium and watch as Ball State University astronomers and their students obtain deep-sky images with extremely light-sensitive cameras on telescopes located at dark sites in Arizona, South America and the Canary Islands. These telescopes span 7 time zones and give access to the Southern Hemisphere sky that is not visible from Indiana. BSU is part of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) that operates these research instruments through the Internet. You will see star clusters, nebulae and galaxies in real time and reach distances of millions of light years! The planetarium star projector will show you where these objects are located in the night sky – even the sky as seen in Chile or the Canary Islands. Join us for this truly unique event. This may be the first time a live-sky event of this scale has been done by any planetarium anywhere!
9:30 p.m.
Image for The Real Universe in Real TimeCome to the Charles W. Brown Planetarium and watch as Ball State University astronomers and their students obtain deep-sky images with extremely light-sensitive cameras on telescopes located at dark sites in Arizona, South America and the Canary Islands. These telescopes span 7 time zones and give access to the Southern Hemisphere sky that is not visible from Indiana. BSU is part of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) that operates these research instruments through the Internet. You will see star clusters, nebulae and galaxies in real time and reach distances of millions of light years! The planetarium star projector will show you where these objects are located in the night sky – even the sky as seen in Chile or the Canary Islands. Join us for this truly unique event. This may be the first time a live-sky event of this scale has been done by any planetarium anywhere!
5 p.m.
Dr. Sharon Lynette Jones Dr. Sharon Lynette Jones will deliver a talk entitled, "Angela Davis and The Power of Protest: Exploring the Dynamics of Resistance and Agency in Interviews and Autobiography"
7:30 p.m.
An thumbnail for In Print Festival of First Books XIVThe fourteenth annual In Print Festival of First Books is a two day event featuring a multi-author reading on Day 1 and a panel discussion on the writing life and literary editing and publishing on Day 2. This year In Print welcomes poet Chen Chen, fiction writer Maria Romasco Moore, creative nonfiction writer Dustin Parsons and editor/poet Allison Joseph.
7:30 p.m.
An thumbnail for In Print Festival of First Books XIVThe fourteenth annual In Print Festival of First Books is a two day event featuring a multi-author reading on Day 1 and a panel discussion on the writing life and literary editing and publishing on Day 2. This year In Print welcomes poet Chen Chen, fiction writer Maria Romasco Moore, creative nonfiction writer Dustin Parsons and editor/poet Allison Joseph.
7 p.m.
Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, an atmospheric scientist and professor at Texas TechDr. Katharine Hayhoe, an atmospheric scientist and professor at Texas Tech and one of TIME's 100 Most Influential People, will deliver the Alice Proctor Killey: “Science in a Fact-Free World.” The values that inspire the quest for higher education define ethical behavior in our political, economic, scientific and personal choices. So, how can good science inform sound societal decision-making?
6:30 p.m.
Strange Alien WorldDuring this live presentation by astronomer and planetarium director, Ronald Kaitchuck, explore some of the thousands of planets. Many of these planets are unlike anything we expected to find. Come and learn how these discoveries are made and how we can search for life on these new worlds.
8 p.m.
Strange Alien WorldDuring this live presentation by astronomer and planetarium director, Ronald Kaitchuck, explore some of the thousands of planets. Many of these planets are unlike anything we expected to find. Come and learn how these discoveries are made and how we can search for life on these new worlds.
6:30 p.m.
Stars to Steer By IconMaking connections is an essential life skill at which introverts can excel. Discover the strengths of introverts in an extroverted world. Reframe what “networking” means, and how to successfully build relationships. Extroverts are welcome, too!
6:30 p.m.
Strange Alien WorldDuring this live presentation by astronomer and planetarium director, Ronald Kaitchuck, explore some of the thousands of planets. Many of these planets are unlike anything we expected to find. Come and learn how these discoveries are made and how we can search for life on these new worlds.
8 p.m.
Strange Alien WorldDuring this live presentation by astronomer and planetarium director, Ronald Kaitchuck, explore some of the thousands of planets. Many of these planets are unlike anything we expected to find. Come and learn how these discoveries are made and how we can search for life on these new worlds.
7:30 p.m.
Image for The Real Universe in Real TimeCome to the Charles W. Brown Planetarium and watch as Ball State University astronomers and their students obtain deep-sky images with extremely light-sensitive cameras on telescopes located at dark sites in Arizona, South America and the Canary Islands. These telescopes span 7 time zones and give access to the Southern Hemisphere sky that is not visible from Indiana. BSU is part of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) that operates these research instruments through the Internet. You will see star clusters, nebulae and galaxies in real time and reach distances of millions of light years! The planetarium star projector will show you where these objects are located in the night sky – even the sky as seen in Chile or the Canary Islands. Join us for this truly unique event. This may be the first time a live-sky event of this scale has been done by any planetarium anywhere!
9:30 p.m.
Image for The Real Universe in Real TimeCome to the Charles W. Brown Planetarium and watch as Ball State University astronomers and their students obtain deep-sky images with extremely light-sensitive cameras on telescopes located at dark sites in Arizona, South America and the Canary Islands. These telescopes span 7 time zones and give access to the Southern Hemisphere sky that is not visible from Indiana. BSU is part of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) that operates these research instruments through the Internet. You will see star clusters, nebulae and galaxies in real time and reach distances of millions of light years! The planetarium star projector will show you where these objects are located in the night sky – even the sky as seen in Chile or the Canary Islands. Join us for this truly unique event. This may be the first time a live-sky event of this scale has been done by any planetarium anywhere!
6:30 p.m.
Black Holes Worm HolesA place from which nothing can escape, not even light, is called a black hole. Once thought to be only a mathematical curiosity, astronomers now think they are real. The theory of relativity also predicts the existence of wormholes that connect different regions of the universe. Popular movies have shown black holes as places of great destruction and wormholes as a way for instantaneous travel across the galaxy. But is any of this true? Did Hollywood get it right?
8 p.m.
Black Holes Worm HolesA place from which nothing can escape, not even light, is called a black hole. Once thought to be only a mathematical curiosity, astronomers now think they are real. The theory of relativity also predicts the existence of wormholes that connect different regions of the universe. Popular movies have shown black holes as places of great destruction and wormholes as a way for instantaneous travel across the galaxy. But is any of this true? Did Hollywood get it right?
6:30 p.m.
Black Holes Worm HolesA place from which nothing can escape, not even light, is called a black hole. Once thought to be only a mathematical curiosity, astronomers now think they are real. The theory of relativity also predicts the existence of wormholes that connect different regions of the universe. Popular movies have shown black holes as places of great destruction and wormholes as a way for instantaneous travel across the galaxy. But is any of this true? Did Hollywood get it right?
8 p.m.
Black Holes Worm HolesA place from which nothing can escape, not even light, is called a black hole. Once thought to be only a mathematical curiosity, astronomers now think they are real. The theory of relativity also predicts the existence of wormholes that connect different regions of the universe. Popular movies have shown black holes as places of great destruction and wormholes as a way for instantaneous travel across the galaxy. But is any of this true? Did Hollywood get it right?