To help you grow as a physicist, astronomer, or engineer, we have a colloquium series each semester.

The series gives you a chance to get away from the classroom setting, hear from people in the business, and see what’s been done elsewhere. We usually bring in about a dozen speakers per semester, including professors from other universities and scientists from business and government .

The colloquium is required, and you do get credit for it. Graduate students have to attend three series, undergraduates, one or two.

To make sure you've soaked it all in, we require that you give a presentation at the end of each semester about what you learned: an oral presentation in the fall and a poster presentation in the spring. These exercises will develop your presentation skills, which is essential in this discipline.

Spring 2020 Colloquium Series

Please join us for our physics and astronomy related seminars. All seminars take place in Cooper Physical Science Building (CP), room 144, and begin at 3:30 p.m. (unless noted otherwise). Refreshments are served at 3:15 p.m. in CP 108. Please call 765-285-8860 for further information.

Abstract: A major theme of galaxy evolution is understanding how today’s Hubble sequence was established — what makes some galaxies red spheroidals and others blue disks, and what drives their relative numbers and their spatial distributions. One way of addressing these questions is that galaxies themselves hold clues to their formation in their internal structures. Recent observations of early-type galaxies in particular (ellipticals and lenticulars) have shown that their seemingly placid, nearly featureless optical images can be deceptive. Kinematic data show that the early-type galaxies have a wide variety of internal kinematic structures that are the relics of dramatic merging and accretion events. A surprising number of the early-type galaxies also contain cold atomic and molecular gas, which is significant because their transitions to the red sequence must involve removing most of their cold gas (the raw material for star formation). We can now also read clues to the evolution of early-type galaxies in the kinematics and rare isotope abundance patterns in the cold gas. Numerical simulations are beginning to work on reproducing these cold gas properties, so that we can place the early-type galaxies into their broader context.

*This presentation will begin at 4:00 P.M.

Abstract: For more than a century, the source of cosmic rays - the highest-energy particles that impact Earth from, seemingly, all parts of the Cosmos - has been one of the greatest mysteries of modern Astrophysics. The best models have suggested that they originate from two broad regions: the lower-energy particles accelerated from within our own galaxy, and the higher-energy particles from beyond. Recent observations of Supernova Remnants by Gamma-ray instruments, such as the Fermi Space Telescope and its ground-based companion, VERITAS, have shed new light on the source of galactic cosmic rays. This talk will focus on these experiments, and the exciting results that are shaping our understanding of the cosmic-ray puzzle.
Abstract: Cosmological simulations, such as Illustris, are at the point where they can accurately reproduce most of the galaxies that we see in the local universe. In this presentation, I will introduce galaxy morphology and talk about the overall structure of galaxies in the local universe. I will relate this to their physical dynamics, gas content, and star formation rates, and relate this to our ideas of cosmology. These same cosmological simulations, however, have a hard time reproducing rare types of galaxies. I will introduce a particularly rare type of galaxy, that of the non-barred ringed galaxy (or Hoag's-type objects). I will then discuss a new non-barred ringed galaxy that we discovered, PGC 1000714. On the surface, PGC 1000714 looks like most non-barred ringed galaxies, but our detailed analysis revealed some even more unusual structures that are difficult to explain using current models of galaxy formation and probably make this galaxy one of a kind.
Abstract will be posted closer to colloquium date.
Abstract will be posted closer to colloquium date.
Abstract will be posted closer to colloquium date.
Abstract will be posted closer to colloquium date.
Abstract will be posted closer to colloquium date.
Abstract will be posted closer to colloquium date.
Abstract will be posted closer to colloquium date.