Friday, April 26, 2019
3 p.m.
Image of Amida Buddha and sculptures in Asian GalleryJoin us in the Asian Art gallery most Fridays at 3:00 pm for a relaxing, end of the week meditation.
5:30 p.m.
Zac is a voice student of Craig Priebe, associate professor of music performance. Free and open to the public.
6 p.m.
People watching presentationA free campus and community event at the David Owsley Museum of Art, 2021 W. Riverside Ave.
6:30 p.m.
Black Holes Worm HolesA place from which nothing can escape, not even light, is called a black hole. Once thought to be only a mathematical curiosity, astronomers now think they are real. The theory of relativity also predicts the existence of wormholes that connect different regions of the universe. Popular movies have shown black holes as places of great destruction and wormholes as a way for instantaneous travel across the galaxy. But is any of this true? Did Hollywood get it right?
7:30 p.m.
Meghan is a piano student of James Helton, professor of music performance. Free and open to the public.
7:30 p.m.
Full Circle DanceA celebration of the relationship between dance and design, Full Circle Dance showcases how design can drastically change the feeling and world of a piece. With a first act that lacks design elements and a second act that features the same works with new life created by our designers, FULL CIRCLE DANCE will illustrate the collaboration between dance and design.
7:30 p.m.
Woodwind musicians performingUnder the direction of Thomas Caneva and Caroline Hand, program to include works by Nicole Piunno (guest composer-in-residence), Tielman Susato, Clifton Williams, Claude Debussy, and James M. Stephenson. Tickets available through the Emens Auditorium Box Office.
8 p.m.
Black Holes Worm HolesA place from which nothing can escape, not even light, is called a black hole. Once thought to be only a mathematical curiosity, astronomers now think they are real. The theory of relativity also predicts the existence of wormholes that connect different regions of the universe. Popular movies have shown black holes as places of great destruction and wormholes as a way for instantaneous travel across the galaxy. But is any of this true? Did Hollywood get it right?