Friday, April 19, 2019
2 p.m.
A male vocal soloist singing on stageThis recital will feature the students of Craig Priebe, associate professor of music performance. Free and open to the public.
3 p.m.
Image of Amida Buddha and sculptures in Asian GalleryJoin us in the Asian Art gallery most Fridays at 3:00 pm for a relaxing, end of the week meditation.
4 p.m.
Every other Friday during the spring 2019 semester, students in the lab sciences will deliver public presentations on their scientific research. This program fosters collaboration among diverse labs in departments such as biology, chemistry, medical education, human performance and more, giving students who participate the opportunity to prepare and present authentic research in a formal but friendly setting.
5:30 p.m.
Lindsey is a bassoon student of Keith Sweger, professor of music performance (bassoon). Free and open to the public.
5:30 p.m.
Rachel is a voice student of Craig Priebe and Joseph Levitt. Free and open to the public.
6:30 p.m.
Black Holes Worm HolesA place from which nothing can escape, not even light, is called a black hole. Once thought to be only a mathematical curiosity, astronomers now think they are real. The theory of relativity also predicts the existence of wormholes that connect different regions of the universe. Popular movies have shown black holes as places of great destruction and wormholes as a way for instantaneous travel across the galaxy. But is any of this true? Did Hollywood get it right?
7:30 p.m.
Andrew will present several self-composed works for a variety of instruments and media. Free and open to the public.
7:30 p.m.
Alexandria is a voice student of Mei Zhong, professor of voice. Free and open to the public.
7:30 p.m.
New Dance by Noa ShadurAfter an 8-week long residency at Ball State during the spring semester, Israeli dancer, choreographer and video artist Noa Shadur’s choreography will be performed by Ball State dance majors. Shadur's previous work has been presented in festivals in Israel, American Dance Festival, ArtEZ Institute for the Arts in Arnhem, The Netherlands, among others.
8 p.m.
Black Holes Worm HolesA place from which nothing can escape, not even light, is called a black hole. Once thought to be only a mathematical curiosity, astronomers now think they are real. The theory of relativity also predicts the existence of wormholes that connect different regions of the universe. Popular movies have shown black holes as places of great destruction and wormholes as a way for instantaneous travel across the galaxy. But is any of this true? Did Hollywood get it right?