We offer a variety of noncredit, cultural enrichment programs in the areas of arts, culture, music, history, science, literature, and languages.

Programs and Courses

Art & Music
  • cost – $30 (includes needlepoint project)
  • instructor – Mrs. Linda Burkhardt, owner of Elegant Needleworks, Inc.

The roots of needlepoint go back thousands of years to the ancient Egyptians, who used small slanted stitches to sew up their canvas tents. Archaeologist Howard Carter, who is known for discovering King Tut’s tomb, found some needlepoint in the cave of a Pharaoh who had lived around 1500 BC. Today, needlepoint offers a wide range of possibilities for self-expression.

In this class, you’ll learn the techniques and stitches necessary to finish the project provided in class. A painted canvas and supplies are provided.

Sessions

You may register for one or both of these sessions:

Needlepoint Christmas Card Project

Friday, October 12
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Bargello Needlepoint Project

Tuesday, November 13
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

(Bargello is one of the easiest forms of needlepoint that consists of just one simple straight stitch. It is repeated in different colors and positions on the canvas to create striking patterns.)

  • cost – $85 each session (includes lunch)
  • instructor – Mrs. Ann Johnson, local artist and former owner of F.B. Fogg

Mrs. Johnson will teach simplified techniques for creating a beautiful watercolor masterpiece from start to finish. Her professional experience enables her to teach novices as well as advanced painters in the same setting.

You’ll learn something new each session, no matter your skill level. A suggested supply list will be provided upon enrollment.

Each class is limited to 15 participants.

Session

The World of Yupo

Friday, October 26
10 a.m.-2 p.m.

In this one-day class, you’ll learn how to work on this exciting new surface called Yupo. Your watercolor painting will include vibrant colors with movement and fluidity, while having the ability to be changeable and controllable. Yupo is the painter’s dream when it’s understood. Ann will show you how easy it is to create a beautiful watercolor masterpiece from start to finish using this synthetic paper.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • instructor – Mr. Jack Carmichael, former Governmental Affairs Coordinator at Ball Corporation

Mr. Carmichael has worked 70 years on his own genealogy, tracing his roots as far back as Charlemagne. He will provide insight on how to locate, examine, and organize records. Computer research is not included.

Sessions

Tuesday, Sept. 11
10-11 a.m.

Tuesday, Sept. 18
10-11 a.m.

Tuesday, Sept. 25
10-11 a.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • facilitator – Mr. William Robertson, retired senior scientist at Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pennsylvania

This DVD series, produced by “The Great Courses,” steps into the world of forensic science and focuses on the most fascinating historical crimes and mysteries from the last two centuries. Delivered by acclaimed Professor Elizabeth A. Murray of Mount St. Joseph University, a forensic anthropologist with nearly 30 years of experience in the field, the lectures will discuss cutting-edge advancements in science and technology and how they are applied to investigations.

You may attend Part 2 without having attended Part 1.

Sessions

Each class includes two 30-minute lectures.

How Reliable Is Eyewitness Testimony?; and The Truth Behind False Confessions

Wednesday, April 24
10-11:15 a.m.

Crooked Cops and Bad Convictions; and Guilty until Proven Innocent

Wednesday Sept. 19
10-11:15 a.m.

Political Assassinations; and Mysteries of the Romanov Family

Wednesday, Sept. 26
10-11:15 a.m.

Forensics of Genocide; and The Nazis and the Witch of Buchenwald

Wednesday, Oct. 3
10-11:15 a.m.

The Spies Have It; and Motive and Kidnapping

Wednesday, Oct. 10
10-11:15 a.m.

Identification Matters; and Past, Present, and Future of Forensics

Wednesday, Oct. 17
10-11:15 a.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • facilitator – Mr. Charles Gilbert, retired Baptist minister

Of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon is the most elusive of these constructions of classical antiquity. While traces have been found of the Great Pyramid of Gaza, the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, the Statue of Zeus at Olympia, the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, the Colossus of Rhodes and the Lighthouse of Alexandria, centuries of digging have turned up nothing about the lost gardens of Babylon—until now.

In this PBS documentary, Dr. Stephanie Dalley uses ancient cuneiform texts and declassified spy satellite images to uncover evidence that supports her theory that the gardens were built 100 years before commonly believed.

Session

Thursday, September 27
2-3 p.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Ms. Jessica Jenkins, curator, Minnetrista

Artwork can be found all around us. Often it is seen on the walls of museums, but it also can be found scattered among the pages of books. While these illustrations tend to get all of the attention of art lovers, the small bookplates that are pasted to the inside cover can be just as beautiful and tell a story all their own.

Jessica will discuss the history of bookplates and what they can reveal about their owners, creators, and the times in which they were made.

Sessions

Friday, November 16
10-11:15 a.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Ms. Suzanne Plesha, president, Friends of the Rinard Orchid Greenhouse

Whether you are an orchid enthusiast or just want to learn more about these fascinating plants, Ball State University’s Rinard Orchid Greenhouse is a local resource for information on orchids and other tropical plants.

The greenhouse houses nearly 2,000 orchids and is one of the largest university-based collections in the U.S. Suzanne will share interesting facts about the greenhouse, its education and conservation missions, future expansion plans, as well as practical tips that will help your orchids thrive.

Session

Thursday, August 23
2-3 p.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Mr. Dane Starbuck, author, musician, and attorney-at-law

Dane Starbuck, author of “John W. Fisher: What a Life!,” will discuss John W. Fisher II, who married Janice Kelsey Ball (daughter of E.B. and Bertha C. Ball) in 1940.

Raised in Maryville, Tennessee, and educated at the University of Tennessee and Harvard Business School, John was one of the most extraordinary business and community leaders in Indiana in the second half of the 20th century. He was a corporate and civic leader with a remarkable story of entrepreneurship, ambition, and striving for excellence.

Books will be available for signing.

Session

Tuesday, September 18
6:30-8 p.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Mr. Chris Flook, lecturer, Department of Telecommunications, Ball State University and president, Delaware County Historical Society

Nearly 100 distinct settlements existed in what we now call Delaware County. Since the end of the American Revolution, Native Americans, pioneer farmers, industrialists and factory workers settled across the county in hamlets, villages and towns of all sizes. Some of these communities survived the ebb and flow of history to prosper, while others disappeared, becoming lost in the collective memory. Today, many residents would only recognize the city Muncie and the towns of Albany, Daleville, Eaton, Gaston, Selma and Yorktown. A few might know of villages such as Desoto, New Burlington, Smithfield and Wheeling. Most have probably never heard of Dogtown, Gate’s Corner, Granville and Soccum.

Drawing upon years of research, Delaware County historian Chris Flook uncovers the stories of these lost towns in his new book, Lost Towns of Delaware County, Indiana. Books will be available for signing.

Session

Friday, November 2
10-11:15 a.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenters – Mr. Keith Roysdon and Mr. Douglas Walker, both award-winning journalists who write for “The Star Press”

Meet Keith Roysdon and Douglas Walker, the authors of “Muncie Murder & Mayhem.” These long-time journalists will share true-crime stories from Muncie's past! Books will be available for signing.

Session

Friday, August 24
10-11:30 a.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Dr. Michael Hicks, director of the Center for Business and Economic Research and the George and Frances Ball distinguished professor of economics in the Miller College of Business at Ball State University

As the Great War ended, victor and vanquished were left with large groups of veterans whose experiences made re-entry into civil life difficult. The variety of their experiences combined with vastly different outcomes for the warring nations yielded surprisingly different experiences for veterans. But, nearly every participating country recognized veterans in ways that continue to shape the experience of returning warriors. From the beginning of World War One through the 1960’s the war experience manifested itself in silk and bronze as medals and decorations were issued by cities, states, nations, veterans organizations and even alliances.

This program will explore that experience, tracing its outline from 1914 to the present. A display of over 100 military medals and decorations from World War One accompanies this presentation.

Session

Tuesday, November 13
6:30-8 p.m.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Dr. Ruth Dudley Edwards, author and journalist

Ruth Dudley Edwards will explain the history and possible future of British succession laws, based on the culture in which these laws were established.

Currently residing in England, Dr. Edwards is a renowned historian, crime novelist, journalist and broadcaster, there and in her native Ireland. She is currently a columnist for the Irish Sunday Independent, among other U.K. newspapers.

Session

Tuesday, October 23
6:30-8 p.m.

  • cost – $95
  • instructor – Mario Tellez-Garcia, a native Spanish speaker and experienced translator, interpreter, and language instructor for both corporate clients and not-for-profit organizations

This eight-week class is for doctors, nurses, medical assistants, and anyone else who might provide health or emergency-related services to Latino patients or families with little or no command of English. It focuses on important words and phrases pertaining to medical circumstances that might be life-saving information if not communicated properly.

Session

eight Wednesdays
Sept. 12-Oct. 31
7-9 p.m.

  • cost – $85
  • instructor – Laura Shadoin, retired teacher, Muncie Community Schools

Instruction in finger spelling and basic conversation based on American Sign Language and signed English.

Session

six Wednesdays
Sept. 12-Oct. 17,
7-9 p.m.

The E.B. and Bertha C. Ball Center has partnered with Westminster Village to offer community enrichment programs at Westminster. These programs are held in the beautifully renovated Legacy Commons Event Hall and are open to the public. Reservations are not required.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – not required
  • presenter – Dr. Vasilis Makris, ophthalmologist

A variety of changes can take place as your eyes age. You can become nearsighted, farsighted, or your eyes can become dry or watery. You could also develop eye disorders such as cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, Glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. However, there are several things you can do to prevent or treat eye disorders or diseases before your vision deteriorates further.

Session

Tuesday, September 18
2-3 p.m.
Legacy Commons Event Hall, Westminster Village

  • cost – free
  • reservations – not required
  • presenter – Mrs. Kathryn Kennison, Director, E.B. and Bertha C. Ball Center, Ball State University

Mystery, often referred to as crime fiction, usually involves a mysterious death or a crime to be solved. Edgar Allen Poe’s short story, The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841), is generally considered the first modern crime fiction story in the US. However, the Bible, Oedipus Rex, and Macbeth could also be considered mysteries by that definition.

Mrs. Kennison will discuss the many elements that make this genre a favorite.

Session

Thursday, October 11
2-3 p.m.
Legacy Commons Event Hall, Westminster Village

The E.B. and Bertha C. Ball Center has partnered with the John Jay Center for Learning to offer community enrichment programs in Portland (101 S. Meridian Street, in Portland).

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • facilitator – Mr. William Robertson, retired senior scientist at Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pennsylvania

An unpromising lump of metal found in a 2,000-year-old shipwreck turns out to be an extraordinary treasure: the world's first computer. When divers first discovered the corroded device in 1900, scientists were puzzled by its function.

This NOVA documentary follows the ingenious detective work that painstakingly discovered the truth about the ancient Greek device, the Antikythera mechanism. It was an astonishingly sophisticated astronomical calculator and eclipse predictor, unrivaled until the era of modern science and believed to be from the workshop of Archimedes.

Session

Thursday, November 8
2-3:15 p.m.

Register

Call 260-729-5525, ext. 221.

  • cost – $85
  • reservations –required
  • instructor – Arturo Octavio Soto, Ball State University graduate and native Spanish speaker

This six-week course is an introduction to Spanish fundamentals, including basic grammar, common expressions and phrases, and social introductions.

Specialized vocabulary could be added based on the needs of the class.

Session

six Tuesdays
Aug. 28-Oct. 2, 6-8 p.m.

Register

Call 260-729-5525, ext. 221.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Dr. Michael Hicks, director of the Center for Business and Economic Research and the George and Frances Ball distinguished professor of economics in the Miller College of Business, Ball State University

Worker training and educational attainment are causal factors in the expansion and relocation of economic activity. Dr. Hicks will discuss these forces and outline regional workforce issues for Jay County and ECI.

Session

Thursday, Sept. 6
6:30-8 p.m.

Register

Call 260-729-5525, ext. 221.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Mr. Jim Waechter, executive director, Delaware County Historical Society

April 6, 1917, the United States officially entered World War I under the command of Maj. Gen. John J. Pershing. This global conflict claimed 116,516 American lives and wounded another 200,000. The Great War shaped the social, economic, military and political fabric of the 20th century.

Mr. Waechter will discuss the war’s impact 100 years later.

Session

Thursday, Sept. 20
6:30-7:30 p.m.

Register

Call 260-729-5525, ext. 221.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Mr. Ralph Frazee, Director of Jay County Emergency Management Agency

Often people are unaware of valuable services in their community until they need them. Last year a tornado hit Jay County, causing tremendous damage to the area.

Mr. Frazee will discuss how Jay County’s Emergency Management Agency managed the situation and assisted residents in the aftermath.

Session

Tuesday, Oct. 9
6:30-7:30 p.m.

Register

Call 260-729-5525, ext. 221.

  • cost – free
  • reservations – required
  • presenter – Dr. Ruth Dudley Edwards, author and journalist

Ruth Dudley Edwards will explain the history and possible future of British succession laws, based on the culture in which these laws were established.

Currently residing in England, Dr. Edwards is a renowned historian, crime novelist, journalist and broadcaster, there and in her native Ireland. She is currently a columnist for the Irish Sunday Independent, among other U.K. newspapers.

Session

Monday, Oct. 22
6:30-8 p.m.

Register

Call 260-729-5525, ext. 221.

Policies

question bubble iconMissed Sessions

If you are unable to attend one or more sessions, please discuss this absence with the instructor before the program begins. There are no make-up sessions.

beverage iconFood and Drinks

Please do not bring outside food or drinks to the Center. Coffee and water will be provided.

children iconChildren

Children under the age of 18 are not permitted in the classroom.

not allowed iconCancellations and Refunds

To cancel your registration, call 765-285-8975. If there is a charge for program, the following refund schedule applies, based on many times your program meets:

Four or more times:

  • 100-percent refund if notified before the first session
  • 50-percent refund if notified after the first session, but before the second session
  • no refund after the second session

Three times or fewer:

  • 100-percent refund if notified before the first session
  • no refund after the first session

rain cloud iconInclement Weather

As a general rule, if Ball State University offices are closed (versus classes being cancelled), the Center is closed. If there is a delay for employees, all morning programs are cancelled.

How to Register

Reservations are required for all programs unless noted otherwise. Programs are only open to adults age 18 and older.

  • If the class you want to take is full, ask to be placed on the waiting list. If an opening occurs, we will call you.
  • If a fee is required, payment is due in full before the first session. You may pay by credit card during the registration process.
  • Payment plans are not available.

Please complete our online form to sign up. (Or if you plan to take one of our courses at the John Jay center in Portland, please call 260-729-5525, ext. 221.)