Theory
ARR 03 - 28 - 2010

Landscape architects, architects, planners, and engineers, believe or not, can all get along. As our world continues to grow and change at an astounding rate into a technologically driven age, the design of our places is also changing at perhaps an even faster pace. As my graduation draws closer, I am searching for a job in these exciting new developments in the design world. It is evident as my search widens, during the still recovering economy, that the design world is not as segregated into individual professions with Landscape architects working seamlessly next to planners, architects, and engineers and vice versa. The lines are blurring on how versatile and flexible one must be in the profession to various styles, projects, and understanding how all professions can and do relate to one another. This was clearly evident and extremely well done in the Olympic complex in Munich. I think I had seen it before in one of my design classes but I was totally caught off guard by the dynamics of the space. The impact that this space has on a designer is incredible, at least for me. The defining principles of the space display a complete integration of all of these professions, as seen in the sketch below. The site design of the space provides a comprehensive flow from one building to the other with little to no abrupt harsh edges. A simple material palette aids in this cohesion. The cooperation of the professions created structures whose built forms respond directly to the landscape in form and in actual contact. While the landscape plan relates to the building forms by creating movement for the eyes, relation to the shape of the structures in geometry, and enclosure for the site. These dramatic interactions can be observed in the photograph below. The structure of the natatorium hits the sculpted plane of the ground creating this impacted form which directs pedestrian movement on the site, and lastly serves as a drainage area for storm water. This feat of design creates such balance and harmony that all designers should strive to work together to think about design differently. As the world changes to more "sustainable" design, I believe it will be less about the aspects of "sustainability" and more about the cooperation and innovation that occurs from all design professions.

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