Ronald V. Morris Papers
RG.04.01.31

Summary Information

Repository

Ball State University Libraries Archives and Special Collections

Creator

Morris, Ronald V.

Title

Ronald V. Morris papers

ID

RG.04.01.31

Date

1988-2008

Extent

1.6 Cubic feet3 Boxes

Language

English

Preferred Citation

Ronald V. Morris Papers and Records, Archives and Special Collections, Ball State University Libraries

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Biographical Note

Ronald Vaughan Morris was born on August 19, 1963 in Beech Grove, Indiana. He received his Bachelor of Science from the University of Indianapolis in Elementary Education in 1986. Upon graduation, Morris worked as an elementary school teacher in the Metropolitan School District of Perry Township in Indianapolis until 1994. During his tenure as an elementary school teacher, Dr. Morris earned a Master of Science degree from Purdue University in Educational Psychology, focusing on Gifted Education. In 1994, Morris stopped teaching and returned to school full time, serving as a Graduate Teaching Assistant at Purdue University while pursuing his Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction, focusing on Social Studies Education. Dr. Morris began his career in academia at Texas Tech University as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 1997. In August 2002, Morris returned to Indiana and went to work at Ball State University as an Assistant Professor in the History Department. Two year later Morris was promoted to Associate Professor. In addition to his many scholarly achievements, Dr. Morris has worked on several special projects. As the Fall 2004 Virginia B. Ball Center for Creative Inquiry Fellow, he organized The Traces and Trails: Wayne County Intersections project which resulted in a traveling exhibition, five traveling artifact and primary source trunks, and an 80 page exhibition catalog. From 2005 to 2008, Morris served as the Primary Investigator on the Ohio River Teacher American History Project, which was a $500,000 grant supported by the U.S. Department of Education.

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Scope and Contents

This collection includes records, 35mm slides, and audiocassettes from Ronald V. Morris in Muncie, Indiana ranging from 1988 to 2008 regarding the Ohio River Teacher American History Project and United States history.

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Arrangement

This collection is organized in the following series:

Subseries 1: Ohio River Teaching American History Project records

Subseries 2: American History Slide presentations

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Administrative Information

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for research.

Copyright Notice

Literary rights, including copyright resides with the creators of the documents or their legal heirs and assigns. All requests to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted to Archives and Special Collections. The publisher must also obtain permission of the copyright holder.

Custodial History

This collection was received by Archives and Special Collections as a donation from Ronald V. Morris.

Accruals

Additions expected.

Processing Information

Collection processing completed 2009/03/27 by Carolyn F. Runyon. EAD finding aid completed 2009/03/27 by Carolyn F. Runyon.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • Ball State University.

Genre(s)

  • Brochures
  • Financial records
  • Schedules, School
  • Slides (Photography)

Geographic Name(s)

  • Muncie (Ind.)
  • Ohio River

Subject(s)

  • Historians
  • History
  • Teachers
  • Teaching

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Collection Inventory

Subseries 1: The Ohio River Teaching American History Project records

Box Folder

Teaching American History Program Eastern Regional Project Directors' Meeting Conference proceedings, 2006

1 1

Teaching American History Program National Project Directors' Conference proceedings, 2007

1 2

Teaching American History Program National Project Directors' Conference proceedings Resource disk, 2007

1 3

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Field Trip administrative records, 2006

1 4

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Field Trip brochures, 2006

1 5

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Field Trip correspondence, 2006/02/20-2006/05/16

1 6

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Field Trip itinerary and records, 2006/05/02

1 7

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Field Trip itinerary and records, 2006/08/10

1 8

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Field Trip itinerary and records, 2006/11/17

1 9

Ball State University Contracts and Grants Office correspondence, 2005-2006

1 10

Ball State University Contracts and Grants Office Check Request Records/Purchased Services records, 2006

1 11

Ball State University Contracts and Grants Office Meals Reimbursement records, 2006

1 12

Ball State University Purchasing Office Purchase Requisition records, 2006-2008

1 13

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Description of Services records, 2006

1 14

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project invoices and receipts, 2006

1 15

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Tax Exemption records, 2006

1 16

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Teacher In-Service itinerary, 2008/06/01-2008/06/06

1 17

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Museum Fair correspondence, 2006/04/18-2006/08/24

1 18

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Museum Fair Participant Registration records, 2006

1 19

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Museum Fair Promotional records, 2006/9/30

1 20

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Advisory Committee Meeting records, 2006/02/02-2006/04/04

1 21

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project correspondence, 2006/01/06-2008/02/11

1 22

Madison, Indiana Video Project records, undated

1 23

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project notes, 2006-2008

1 24

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Overview, undated

1 25

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project, 2006

1 26

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project master copy, 2006

1 27-30

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project brochures, 2006

1 31

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project press releases, 2006-01/12-2006/04/26

1 32

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Summer Seminar records, 2006/06/04-2006/06/09

1 33

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Summer Seminar records, 2006/08/06-2006/08/11

1 34

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Summer Seminar records, 2007/06/17-2007/06/22

1 35

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Summer Seminar records, 2007/07/29-2007/08/03

1 36

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary and records, 2006/01/24

1 37

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary and records, 2006/02/07

1 38

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary and records, 2006/03/07

1 39

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary and records, 2006/04/04

1 40

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary and records, 2006/05/02

1 41

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary, 2006/06/04-2006/06/09

1 42

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary, 2006/08/06-2006/08/11

1 43

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary, 2006/09/09

1 44

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary and records, 2006/10/12

1 45

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary, 2006/11/10

1 46

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary, 2007/01/18

1 47

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary, 2007/02/15

1 48

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary, 2007/03/01

1 49

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop itinerary, 2007/05/01

1 50

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project Workshop Year III itineraries, 2007

1 51

The Ohio River Teaching American History Project electronic records, 2006-2008

1 52

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Subseries 2: American History Teaching slides

Box Folder

0001-0086 Prehistoric Peoples and Sites of North America slides, 1989-1990

2 1

0087-0121 Early American Historic Site Jamestown, Virginia slides, 1989

2 2

0122-0220 Early American Historic Site Williamsburg, Virginia slides, 1989

2 3

0221-0412 Early American Historic Figure George Rogers Clark slides, 1983-1989

2 4

0413-0437 Early American Historic Figure Patrick Henry slides, 1988-1989

2 5

0438-0501 Early American Historic Figure Thomas Jefferson slides, 1989

2 6

0502-0510 Early American Historic Figure James Monroe slides, 1989

2 7

0511-0560 Early American Historic Figure George Washington slides, 1989

2 8

0561-0581 Early American Historic Figure George Wythe slides, 1989

2 9

0582-0621 United States Civil War slides, 1983

2 10

0622-0643 United States Civil War Common Soldiers slides, 1989-1992

2 11

0644-0649 United States Civil War Leader Jefferson Davis slides, 1989

2 12

2304-2313 United States Civil War Leader Andrew Johnson slides, undated

2 13

0650-0681 United States Civil War Pennsylvania Campaign of 1862, 1989-1991

2 14

0682-0727 United States Civil War Battle of Bull Run slides, 1992

Historical Note

The First Battle of Bull Run, also referred to as the First Battle of Manassas, was the first major engagement of the United States Civil War, occurring on July 21, 1861. Union forces led by General Irvin McDowell moved on General P. G. T. Beauregard's Confederate troops at Manassas Junction, Virginia to prevent Confederate army troops stationed in Winchester, Virginia from joining Beauregard. McDowell failed, and some of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston's troops from Winchester reached Manassas. On July 21, McDowell attacked the Confederates near the stone bridge over Bull Run and drove them back to the Henry House Hill. There, Confederate resistance, with General Thomas J. Jackson standing like a "stone wall," checked the Union advance, and the arrival of General E. Kirby Smith's brigade turned the tide against the Union forces. The unseasoned Union volunteers retreated, fleeing along roads jammed by panicked civilians who had amassed to watch the battle. The win at the First Battle of Bull Run South encouraged Confederate supporters, while Union soldiers were spurred to improve efforts.

Bibliography

The Columbia Encyclopedia. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. s.v. "Bull Run," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/columency/bull_run (accessed October 01, 2009).

2 15

0728-0853 United States Civil War Second Battle of Bull Run slides, 1992

Historical Note

The Second Battle of Bull Run, or the Second Battle of Manassas, resulted in victory for the Confederates on August 30, 1862. In July of 1862 General John Pope Union Army of Virginia threatened to town of Gordonsville, Virginia, an important railroad junction between Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley. On August 9, 1862, Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson defeated a corps of Pope's Army in the Battle of Mt. Cedar, and Union General George McClellan came to reinforce Pope. Lee planned to attack Pope before McClellan's reinforcements could arrive and concentrated his entire force at Gordonsville, Virginia. By strategically maneuvering his troops, Lee managed to destroy Union communications and supplies, and stationed his troops just west of the first Bull Run battlefield on August 28, 1862 where he awaited reinforcements from Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Pope was attacking Jackson when his reinforcements arrived August 29, and mistaking Jackson's troop re-formation for retreat, renewed attacks on August 30, 1862. Union troops were badly defeated, forcing Pope to retreat to Chantilly where Union forces finally stopped Jackson on September 1, 1862.

Bibliography

The Columbia Encyclopedia. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. s.v. "Bull Run," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/columency/bull_run (accessed October 01, 2009).

2 16

0854-0903 United States Civil War Battle of Stones River slides, 1989-1991

2 17

0904-1030 United States Civil War Battle of Antietam slides, 1992

Historical Note

The Battle of Antietam took place on September 17, 1862 in Sharpsburg, Maryland along Antietam Creek. 23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing after twelve hours of combat on September 17, 1862. Following the Second Battle of Bull Run (also referred to as the Second Battle of Manassas) which occurred from August 28 to August 30, 1862, the Battle of Antietam was part of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's 1862 Maryland Campaign. The Battle of Antietam ended the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia's first invasion into the North and led to Abraham Lincoln's issuance of the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

Bibliography

The Reader's Companion to Military History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1996. s.v. "Antietam, Battle of," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/rcmh/antietam_battle_of (accessed September 30, 2009).

2 18

1031-1065 United States Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg slides, 1989

Historical Note

The Battle of Fredericksburg was fought over three days from December 13 to December 15, 1862 and followed the Battle of Antietam as well as the Second Battle of Bull Run. Union General Ambrose Burnside moved three "grand divisions" to the north side of the Rappahannock River, positioning himself to take Richmond, Virginia, the capital of the Confederacy. Confederate General Robert E. Lee anticipated Ambrose's strategy, and headed off successive Union charges. On December 15, 1862, Ambrose withdrew troops after suffering losses of more than 12,000 soldiers. The Union defeat significantly impacted morale among Union supporters and troops.

Bibliography

The Columbia Encyclopedia. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. s.v. "Fredericksburg, battle of," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/columency/fredericksburg_battle_of (accessed October 01, 2009).

2 19

1066-1102 United States Civil War Battle of Fort Donelson slides, 1989-1992

Historical Note

The Battle of Fort Donelson was an early military engagement of the United States Civil War that occurred on February 6, 1862 at Fort Donelson, Tennessee along the Cumberland River. In 1862, Union General Ulysses S. Grant led a siege of the Confederate-controlled fort and forced an unconditional surrender of the thirteen thousand Confederate troops. This act made Grant a hero and earned him the nickname "Unconditional Surrender Grant." After the fall of Fort Donelson, the South was forced to give up southern Kentucky and much of Middle and West Tennessee. The Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers, and railroads in the area, became vital Federal supply lines.

Bibliography

The Great American History Fact-Finder. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004. s.v. "Fort Donelson, Battle of," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/hmgahff/fort_donelson_battle_of (accessed October 01, 2009).

Fort Donelson National Battlefield, "The Battle." http://www.nps.gov/fodo/planyourvisit/thebattleforfortdonelson.htm (accessed 10/01/2009).

2 20

1103-1166 United States Civil War Battle of Shiloh slides, 1992

Historical Note

The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was a major battle in the Western Theater of the American Civil War, fought April 6 and 7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. The battle is named for Shiloh Church, a meetinghouse southwest of Pittsburg Landing. After the fall of Fort Donelson to the Union army, General Ulysses S. Grant advanced up the Tennessee River and established headquarters for his Army of the Tennessee at Savannah, placing five divisions at Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee. Confederate General A. S. Johnson made an attack on Grant's troops near Shiloh Church early on April 6, 1862. In the day's fighting the Confederates swept the field, but Johnston was killed. Second in command, Confederate General P. G. T. Beauregard arrived at night and ceased the fighting. Union forces had been pushed back over a mile from their first positions but, although hard-pressed, still held Pittsburg Landing. On April 7, 1862, Union forces outnumbered Beauregard's troops and forced their withdrawal to Corinth, which was abandoned to Union forces a month later. The controversial Union win resulted in losses on each side of more than 10,000.

Bibliography

The Columbia Encyclopedia. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. s.v. "Shiloh, battle of," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/columency/shiloh_battle_of (accessed October 01, 2009).

2 21

1167-1285 United States Civil War Battle of Vicksburg slides, 1992

Historical Note

The Battle of Vicksburg was a major military engagement of the United States Civil War that took place from May 19, 1863 to July 4, 1863. Vicksburg, Mississippi served as a Confederate stronghold. Union General Ulysses S. Grant unsuccessfully attacked the city numerous times, and having been repulsed, laid siege, approaching from the south and the east. After six weeks of siege, Confederate General John Pemberton surrendered on July 4, 1863.

Bibliography

The Great American History Fact-Finder. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004. s.v. "Vicksburg, Battle of," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/hmgahff/vicksburg_battle_of (accessed October 09, 2009).

3 1

1286-1322 United States Civil War Battle of Wilderness slides, 1992

3 2

1323-1376 United States Civil War Battle of Spotsylvania slides, 1992

3 3

1377-1409 United States Civil War Battle of Petersburg, slides 1989

3 4

1410-1507 Architecture of Indiana slides, 1988-1989

3 5

1508-1581 Indiana's Religious Heritage slides, 1988-1989

3 6

1582-1659 Indiana Through the Season slides, 1987-1988

3 7

1660-1797 1888-1988 Indianapolis: Growing on One Hundred Years slides, 1988

3 8

1798-1877 Indianapolis, Indiana Crown Hill Cemetery slides, 1988-1989

Historical Note

Crown Hill Cemetery is the United State's third largest cemetery, located 2.8 miles northwest of Monument Circle in Indianapolis, Indiana. Crown Hill was incorporated as a nonprofit, nondenominational cemetery on September 25, 1863, at a time when Greenlawn Cemetery was the principal burial ground in the Indianapolis. Concern over Greenlawn's limited acreage and lack of care spurred the creation of a 30-member board of incorporators that established Crown Hill. The land selected for the cemetery was considered some of the most beautiful in Marion County. From 842-foot Crown Hill, so named because it was the "crowning hill among all hills in Marion County," visitors encountered an extraordinary view of Indianapolis and the surrounding countryside. Crown Hill Cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, and the site receives more than 25,000 visitors annually.

Bibliography

Crown Hill Heritage Foundation, "A Brief Look at the History of Crown Hill Cemetery." http://crownhillhf.org/bestofindytours_history.html (accessed 2009-10-01).

3 9

1878-1926 Indianapolis, Indiana Crown Hill Cemetery Art slides, 1989

Historical Note

Crown Hill Cemetery is the United State's third largest cemetery, located 2.8 miles northwest of Monument Circle in Indianapolis, Indiana. Crown Hill was incorporated as a nonprofit, nondenominational cemetery on September 25, 1863, at a time when Greenlawn Cemetery was the principal burial ground in the Indianapolis. Concern over Greenlawn's limited acreage and lack of care spurred the creation of a 30-member board of incorporators that established Crown Hill. The land selected for the cemetery was considered some of the most beautiful in Marion County. From 842-foot Crown Hill, so named because it was the "crowning hill among all hills in Marion County," visitors encountered an extraordinary view of Indianapolis and the surrounding countryside. Crown Hill Cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, and the site receives more than 25,000 visitors annually.

Bibliography

Crown Hill Heritage Foundation, "A Brief Look at the History of Crown Hill Cemetery." http://crownhillhf.org/bestofindytours_history.html (accessed 2009-10-01).

3 10

1927-2018 Images of New Harmony, Indiana slides, 1988-1990

Historical Note

Settled by a group of German Pietists led by George Rapp, the Utopian community of Harmonie was established near the lower Wabash River in Posey County, Indiana in 1815. In 1825, the founding group left and sold the town to Robert Owen, a British industrialist who envisioned a secular and scientific Utopia that he named New Harmony. Owen's vision was short lived, failing within two years, but the scientific and educational tradition continues to influence the community.

Bibliography

Encyclopedia of the United States in the Nineteenth Century. Farmington: Gale, 2000. s.v. "INDIANA," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/galeus/indiana (accessed October 01, 2009).

Merriam-Webster's Geographical Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2007. s.v. "New Harmony," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/mwgeog/new_harmony (accessed October 01, 2009).

3 11

2019-2105 The Moravian Church slides, 1989-1990

Historical Note

The Moravian Church or the Renewed Church of the Brethren is an evangelical Christian tradition whose followers are sometimes referred to as United Brethren or Herrnhuters. The tradition originated 1457 near Kunwald, Bohemia and was referred to as the Church of the Brotherhood. A break between the new brotherhood and the Roman Church occurred in 1467, and persecution drove many of the followers out of Bohemia and Moravia into Poland, Austria, and elsewhere in Eastern Europe. In 1722 a company of those still faithful to the teachings of the Brethren took refuge in Saxony, where they built a town, Herrnhut, reviving the elements of the original church and establishing the Renewed Moravian Church in 1727. In 1999, the United States Brethren joined with several others in establishing full communion with the country's largest Lutheran denomination. Moravians emphasize conduct rather than doctrine, governing themselves with provincial synods, bishops having only spiritual and administrative authority. Moravian churches are renowned for musical talents, especially part-singing of congregations.

Bibliography

The Columbia Encyclopedia. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. s.v. "Moravian Church," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/columency/moravian_church (accessed October 01, 2009).

3 12

2106-2115 Archaeological Methods slides, 1989

Historical Note

Archaeology is a branch of anthropology that seeks to document and explain continuity and change and similarities and differences among human cultures. Archaeologists work with the material remains of cultures, past and present, providing the only source of information available for past illiterate societies and supplementing written sources for historical and contemporary groups.

Bibliography

The Columbia Encyclopedia. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. s.v. "archaeology," http://www.credoreference.com/entry/columency/archaeology (accessed October 01, 2009).

3 13

2116-2163 Ralph Coddington slides, 1990

3 14

2164-2177 Las Vegas, Nevada slides, undated

3 15

2178-2254 A Woman Named Mary Bryan slides, 1983-1988

3 16

2255-2303 New MBAYH slides, 1989-1990

3 17

2314-2337 Unknown slides, 1989

3 18

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