Diane Bottomley is an Associate Professor in the Elementary Education Department at Ball State University. She teaches undergraduate and graduate literacy courses and serves as a Professional Development School (PDS) liaison with a local elementary school. Providing professional development to teachers is one of her responsibilities as a PDS liaison. Her research interests include teacher preparation, assessment, PDS, and literacy instruction. She has presented at numerous local, state, national, and international educational conferences and published in a variety of professional journals. Her Ph.D. is in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in language and literacy from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Peggy Rice is an Associate Professor of English at Ball State University where she teaches English education methods courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Prior to earning her doctorate, Dr. Rice taught 10 years in the public schools. Recently, she collaborated with Dr. Bottomley on a two year project, creating and implementing an integrated literacy block in a Professional Development School, working with K-6 classroom teachers and preservice teachers. That project was funded from a BSU Title II Grant in the amount of $28,610.00. Her research interests include teacher preparation, curriculum development, assessment, literacy instruction, and children’s literature. She has presented at numerous national and international educational conferences and published in several educational journals. Her Ph.D. is in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in English education from the University of Louisiana at Baton Rouge.

Matthew Stuve is the Director of the Center for Technology in Education and an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology. Dr. Stuve created and directed the Educational Technology Programs at Ball State University from 1999 to 2008. He joins the Department of Educational Psychology in the summer of 2011 to pursue research and teaching in the areas of assessment technologies, visual literacy and human-computer interaction (HCI). From 1999-2003, Dr. Stuve was co-principal investigator of a $3M PT3 funded by the U.S. Department of Education. The BSU PT3 project involved campus- and school-based reform efforts to improve teacher education and professional practice of in-services teachers. Some of Dr. Stuve’s work in the PT3 project included developing web portals for K-12 collaboration and assessment. His research interests include educational informatics, assessment technologies, digital and representational literacies, and technology in teacher education. His Ph.D. is in Educational Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with emphases in learning, cognition and technology.