Mycological Society of America
Slide Collection

Find slides of  Sandra Anagnostakis; Jim AndersonDon Barr; Various Sources (Primarily Meredith Blackwell);
Famous Mycologist Portraits; David M. GeiserR.W. LichtwardtCharles MimsDavid Porter, et alYves RenaudFred Rhoades; Michael Tansey; Daniel Wubah

Contributed by Charles Mims:
I. Myxomycetes
1. Myxomycetes, TEM, precleavage sporangium
2. Myxomycetes, TEM, cytoplasm precleavage sporangium
3. Myxomycetes, TEM, developing capillitial thread
4. Myxomycetes, TEM, young spore initial
5. Myxomycetes, TEM, young spore with surface spines
6. Myxomycetes, TEM, mature spore
7. Myxomycetes, TEM, mature spores in sporangium
8. Myxomycetes, TEM, early spore germination
9. Myxomycetes, TEM, late spore germination
10. Myxomycetes, TEM, anterior end of swarm cell
II. Rusts and Smuts
11. Rust, SEM, aecium with aeciospores
12. Rust, SEM, section of aecium
13. Rust, SEM, chains of aeciospores
14. Rust, SEM, chains of aeciospores
15. Rust, SEM, chain of aeciospores
16. Rust, SEM, uredinium with urediniospores
17. Rust, SEM, uredinium with urediniospores
18. Rust, SEM, uredinium with urediniospores
19. Rust, SEM, developing urediniospores
20. Rust, SEM, urediniospores
21. Rust, SEM, urediniospore with pedicel
22. Rust, SEM, urediniospore with pedicel
23. Rust, SEM, telium with teliospores
24. Rust, SEM, mass of teliospores
25. Rust, SEM, teliospore with pedicel
26. Rust, SEM,  teliospores with pedicels, early germination
27. Rust, SEM,  germinating teliospore
28. Rust, SEM,  four-celled basidium
29. Rust, SEM,  four-celled basidium with sterigmata
30. Rust, SEM,  basidiospores
31. Rust, SEM,  urediniospores germling with appressorium
32. Rust, TEM, intercellular hypha
33. Rust SEM, haustorium (host cell contents removed)
34. Rust, TEM, neck band of haustorium
35. Smut, TEM, intercellular hypha between host cells
36. Smut, TEM, intercellular hypha
37. Smut, TEM, teliospore
III. Other Basidiomycetes
38. TEM, dikaryotic basidium
39. TEM, basidiospores/sterigmata
40. TEM, basidiospore, hilar region
41. TEM, basidiospore, hilar region
42. SEM, basidial basidiospores
43. SEM, basidial basidiospores
44. SEM, gasteromycete basidiospores
45. SEM, hilar region, gasteromycete basidiospore
46. SEM, developing pores of polypore
47. SEM, developing pores of polypore
48. SEM, mature pores of polypore
49. SEM, basidia, basidiospores of polypore
50. SEM, hyphae
IV. Ascomycetes
51. SEM, developing conidiophores of Aspergillus
52. SEM, mature conidiophores of Aspergillus
53. TEM, conidiophore of Aspergillus
54. TEM, conidiophore/conidia of Aspergillus
55. TEM, dikaryotic ascus mother cell
56. TEM, fusion nucleus, ascus
57. TEM, developing ascus
58. TEM, synaptonemal complexes, meiotic ascus nucleus
59. TEM, ascospore initial
60. TEM, developing ascospore/epiplasm
61. TEM, filiform ascospores in ascus
62. TEM, young ascospores in ascus
63. TEM, maturing ascospore in ascus

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Contributed by Michael Tansey:
1. Pythium (humor)
2. Grotesque person/Little Orphan Annie Recreational use of hallucinogenic mushrooms (humor).
3. Finger in dike. Importance of diagnosis prior to treatment (humor).
4. Amerospores/American flag (humor)
5. Johnathon Livingston Sporangium (humor)
6. Convex/concave mushrooms (humor)
7. Stilbella (humor)
8. Man of couch/spore size (humor)
9. Hallucinating mycology student (humor)
10. Beetle slept under bolete (humor)
11. Need for closer look for diagnosis (humor)
12. Falling leaf/Snoopy (humor)
13. Einstein/Five Kingdoms (humor)
14. Doghouse/Pilobolus (humor)
15. Lumberjacks/Ceratocystis (humor)
16. How nature says "Do not touch." (humor)
17. Heaven/Mycologia (humor)
18. Prisoner hanging in chains/loosen culture tube caps (humor)
19. Pigs/truffles (humor)
20. Erysiphalean appendages ("touchy") (humor)
21. Giant morel on station wagon (humor)
22. Protecting asci/truffle (humor)
23. Pilobolus humor/squirt in eye (humor)
24. Turkey tail (humor)
25. Skin disease/animal on back (humor)
26. Russians/Amanita muscaria (humor)
27. Lions eating mycologist (humor)
28. Birdcage/bedtime blanket spores (humor)
29. Erysiphalean appendages ("Cindy's afro") (humor)
30. Dog on couch/Microsporum canis (humor)
31. Coprinus deliquescence/academic career (humor)
32. Coprinus pregnancy (humor)
33. Experiencing the realization that fungi have own Kingdom (humor)
34. Leopards in tree/agaricologist (humor)
35. Cystidia (humor)
36. It'll never work/interspecific love (humor)
37. "Huge fungus"/morel on old sedan (humor)
38. Word picture of mushroom (humor)
39. Student nightmare/Saccaradoan spores (humor)
40. HALLUCINATION/spelling (humor)
41. Laundromat for dermatophytes' macrospores (humor)
42. People & dog with targets/Microsporum (humor)
43. Forbidden things/loosen caps (humor)
44. Basidiospores/Mickey Mouse Club (humor)
45. Naked woman at pond/ dermatophyte on arm. (Anyone can get dermatophytic infections.)
46. Moses with table/classification systems (humor)
47. Man with basidiomycosis/Get out in sun (humor)
48. Figment of imagination/anamorph/teleomorph (humor)
49. Basidiospore discharge/parachutes (humor)
50. Cinema/synnema (humor)
51. Alchemists/steroid biotransformation (humor)
52. Amerospore/factory reject (humor)
53. Two men at bar/anamorph-teleomorph names (humor)
54. Taxonomist's nightmare (humor)
55. End of world/learning Puccinia graminis life cycle (humor)
56. Razor blade in use by Geotrichum candidum (humor)
57. Undernourished scolecospore (humor)
58. Amerospore traffic jam (humor)
59. Four student microscopes inspecting an amerospore (humor)
60. Cowardly ballistospore making a landing (humor)
61. Conidium of Fusidium wearing an Angora sweater (humor)
62. Absent minded scolecospore (humor)
63. Scolecospore rollerskating (humor)
64. Elephant giving an amerospore a friendly pat (humor)
65. Amoeboid creature ingesting solid food (humor)
66. Looks like EM view of cell wall fraction, but is aerial view of logs on pond (humor)
67. Pollen on lake (for chytrid lectures)
68. Moldy insulation on pipes. (From case of occupatioal allergy--desk was directly beneath).
69. Trichoderma viride sporulating on soil, pure culture
70. Aspergillus flavus/black pepper (humor)
71. State park guide; Indiana; symbol used for "mushrooming is allowed" is a morel, not an agaric.

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Contributed by David Porter (1-26), Melvin Fuller (35-37), Robby Roberson (33) and James White, Jr. (28-31):
1. Amanita muscaria
2. Amanita muscaria
3. Amanita citrina
5. Laccaria laccata
6. Omphalotus illudens
7. Melanoleuca sp. (sand dune habitat)
8. Lactarius indigo
9. Entoloma abortivum
10. Pluteus cervinus
11. Agrocybe sp.
12. Agrocybe firma
13. Stropharia kaufmanii
14. Paneolus sp.
15. Psathyrella ammonphila
16. Suillus americanus
17. Hericium erinaceus
18. Lycoperdon marginatum
19. Lycoperdon pyriforme
20. Geastrum sp.
21. Myriostoma coliformis
22. Mutinus caninus
23. Phallus ravenelii
24. Clathrus columnatus
25. Pseudocolus shellenbergiae
26. Morchella esculenta
28. Epichloe typhina (stromata)
29. Epichloe typhina (stroma with fly larva)
30. Acremonium spp. (spermatial stages of Epichloe)
31. Epichloe hyphae between aleurone and seed coat of grass seed
33. Hyphal tip of Sclerotium rolfsii (fixed by freeze substitution)
35. Blastocladiella emersonii zoospores
36. Chytridium confervae release of zoospores
37. Achyla on frog
40. John Webster in rice paddy in Japan during IMC3 (from DP)

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Contributed by Don Barr:
1. Rhizophydium granulosporum Scherffel (Chytridiales): Sporangia on a moribund filament of Oedogonium sp. (X 256)
2. Rhizophydium granulosporum Scherffel (Chytridiales): Empty sporangia on Spirogyra; note the delicate rhizoids (X 256)
3. Rhizophydium graminis Ledingham (Chytridiales): Mature and empty sporangia on a root hair of wheat; note
        the delicate rhizoids inside the root hair (X 256)
4. Chytriomyces poculatus Willoughby & Townley (Chytridiales): Sporangia growing on pine pollen (X 160)
5. Chytriomyces poculatus Willoughby & Townley (Chytridiales): Empty sporangium n pine pollen; note the
        operculum at the orifice (X 160)
6. Blyttiomyces helicus Sparrow & Barr (Chytridiales): Empty sporangium on pine pollen from side view; note
        helical bands (X 160)
7. Blyttiomyces helicus Sparrow & Barr (Chytridiales): Empty sporangium on pine pollen from face-on view of
        orifice; note helical bands (X 160)
8. Chytridium confervae (Wille) Minden (Chytridiales): A series illustrating zoospore discharge. The zoospores
        are released into an evanescent, membrane-less vesicle. The operculum is exposed to the right of the
        orifice in the last slide. (A series of four slides, all at X 256.) Slide 8a; Slide 8b; Slide 8c; Slide 8d.
9. Nowakowskiella elegans (Nowak.) Schroeter (Chytridiales): Mature sporangia (X 160)
10. Olpidium brassicae (Wor.) Dang. (Spizellomycetales?): Sporangia, some with discharge tubes, inside root cells
        (X 160)
11. Olpidium brassicae (Wor.) Dang. (Spizellomycetales?): Stellate resting spores inside root cells (X 160)
12. Olpidium brassicae (Wor.) Dang. (Spizellomycetales?): Globose, uniflagellated zoospores (X 400)
13. Entophyctis variabilis Powell & Koch (Spizellomycetales?): Sporangia inside pollen grains (X 256)
14. Spizellomyces pseudodichotomus Barr (Spizellomycetales): Sporangia inside pollen grains (X 256)
15. Spizellomyces punctatus (Koch) Barr (Spizellomycetales): Sporangium with rhizoid system growing in broth
        culture (X 160)
16. Piromyces communis Gold (Spizellomycetales): A rumen fungus growing in culture on filter paper (X 64)
17. Piromyces communis Gold (Spizellomycetales): Sporangium, sporangiophore and part of the rhizoid system
        growing in culture (X 160)
18. Blastocladiella emersoni Cantino & Hyatt (Blastocladiales): Sporangium, sporangiophore and part of rhizoid
        system (X 64)
19. Allomyces arbuscula Butler (Blastocladiales): Gametothallus with antheridia (outer) and oogonia (inner)
        (X 160)
20. Allomyces arbuscula Butler (Blastocladiales): Sporothallus with resting spores (X 64)
21. Monoblepharella sp. (Monoblepharidales): Thallus with antheridia and oogonia (the globose bodies are
        probably mature oospores)
22. Polymyxa graminis Ledingham (Plasmodiophorales): Clusters of resting spores inside root cells of wheat
        (X 205)
23. Ligniera pilorum Fron & Gaillat (Plasmodiophorales): Resting spores inside a root hair of Impatiens.
24. Hyphochytrium catenoides Karling (Hyphochytriales): Sporangia inside pine pollen (X 256)
25. Hyphochytrium catenoides Karling (Hyphochytriales): Growth from an infected pine pollen in two days on
        nutrient agar (X 50)
26. Lagena radicicola Vanterpool & Ledingham (Oomycetes): Sporangial thalli inside root cells of wheat (X 160)
27. Sparomyces elongatus (Cornu) Coker (Oomycetes): Sporangia (X 160)
28. Saprolegnia hypogynus (Pringsheim) de Bary (Oomycetes): Oogonia each with several oospores (X 64)
29. Pythium aphanidermatum (Edson) Fitzp. (Oomycetes): Clusters of sporangia growing on nutrient agar (X 64)
30. Pythium aphanidermatum (Edson) Fitzp. (Oomycetes): Oogonia, oospores and antheridia (X 256)
31. Pythium erythroseptica Pethybr. (Oomycetes): Oogonia, oospores and antheridia (X 256)

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Contributed by Yves Renaud:
1-4. Xerocomus parasiticus (Bull) Quel.: Collected in Lorraine France in September 1987 for the Fungi Show of
        Richardmenil by the Societe Lorraine de Mycologie. (Four slides).
13-14. Leucocoprinus cretatus: On a pile of stable-litter, near VEXELISE 54 (M&M) France;
        Alt: 300m. Collected by Mr. Morcel (Societe Lorraine de Mycologie Nancy) (Two slides).
15. Russula lepida Fr. with some Cantharellus cibarius at the back: Collected: Bolis Mortaison
        Forest of Vitrimont BLAINVILLE 54 (M&M) France in September 1987. Alt: 250m.
16. Tricholoma aurantium (Sch) Ricken: Collected by the Societe Lorraine de Mycologie for the
        Fungi Show of Nancy in October 1982.
17. Clitocybe arantiaca Studer: Mixed forest (Leafy/Conifers) Bois Mortaison Forest of Vitrimont, BLAINVILLE
        54 (M&M) France. Collected in October 1987; Alt:250m.
18. Cortinarius bolaris (Pers) Fries: Same forest as no. 17. Autumn 1982.
19. Cortinarius semisanguineus (Fr) Gill.: Same forest as no. 17.
20. Young Cortinarius violaceus (L) Fr.: Forest of leafy between CHARMES and St. Remy-Aux-Bois 88 (Vosges)
        France. Boils de la Justice; Alt:280m.
23. Lycoperdon mammiforme (L. velatum) Persoon: Leafy forest - Charmes/Damas 88 (Vosges) France;
        August 14 1988.
24. Sarcoscypha coccinea (Jacq) Lamb.: Collected in January 1983 near Lay St. Christopher near Nancy, France;
        Alt: 382m.
25. Schizophylum commune (L.) Fr.: Collected Bois Mortaison, Forest of Vitrimont, BLAINVILLE; Alt:250m.
26. Rhodophyllus cuculatus: Same location as no. 25.
27. Collybia cirrhata (Pers) Kum.: Same location as no. 25.
28. Sropharia squamosa (Pers) Quel.
29. Exidia glandulosa (truncata) (Fr.): Collect in January 1980; Dead wood; Bois-Mortaison, Forest of Vitrimont,
        BLANVILLE54 (M&M) France; Alt:250m.
30. Pulcherricium caeruleum (Lam.) Terrana: Collected October 1982, same forest as no. 29.
31. Spines of Sarcodon imbricatum (L) Karst.: Collected October 1981 by a visitor of the Fungi show of the
        Societe Lorraine de Mycologie Nancy 54 (France).

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Contributed by Sandra Anagnostakis (Chestnut Blight):
1. American chestnut trees at Poplar Cove, Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest, NC (Photo S.V. Streeter, January 15,
        1910).
2. American chestnut tree 23 inches dbh, 83 feet tall; Scotland, Connecticut, 1905.
3. Chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica [Murr.] Barr) on American chestnut tree (Castanea dentata [Marsh]
        Borkh.). Fungus probably entered at broken branch stub on left of trunk; orange stromata have broken
        through the lenticels to the surface; concentric ridges of callose are tree's defense, which fails.
4. American chestnut tree killed by blight canker at base has sprouted from root collar.
5. American chestnut sprout against old chestnut fence in forest (good picture of leaf form).
6. Three virulent (V) strains of Cryphonectria parasitica (top) and their hypovirulent (H) converts (bottom). Each H
        strain is directly under its V progenitor and has the same nuclear genotype. Difference in morphology is
        caused by cytoplasmic genes from Italian H strains. [PDA (Difco), 12 hrs white fluorescent light, 28 C
        (12 hr)]

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Contributed by R. W. Lichtwardt (Trichomycetes):
1. Genistelloides helicoides (RMBL-L-13): Genistelloides helicoides Williams & Lichtwardt (Harpellales,
        Legeriomycetaceae) from the hindgut of a stonefly nymph (Zapada haysi) from a Rocky Mountain stream.
        Developing trichospores. Note the coiled appendages within the generative cells from which the
        trichospores grow. In this genus the appendages become visible before the exogenous trichospores begin to
        develop.
2. Genistelloides helicoides (RMBL-M-17): Released trichospore with two coiled appendages. Appendages may
        function to restrain spores from drifting downstream, thus retaining them in the vicinity of the host
        population and leading to possible ingestion and germination in the insect gut.
3. Semitism celeste (HAW-A-34): Semitism Celeste Lichtwardt (Harpellales, Legeriomycetaceae). Sporulating
        thallus and released trichospores with a single appendages. Axenic culture (JAP-77-8) made from the
        hindgut of a mosquito larva collected in a stone trough at a Shinto shrine in Japan. This fungus is
        worldwide and usually inhabits mosquito larvae, but is known to occur in several other families of
        dipteran larvae.
4. Smittium alpinum (MBL-E-8): Smittium alpinum Lichtwardt Biconical zygospores and oval trichospores. From
        the hindgut of an aquatic midge larva near the continental Divide in Glacier National Park. The fungus is
        known only from larvae of Diamesa sp. (Chironomidae) from the Rocky Mountains, the Alps, northern
        Sweden.
5. Stachvlina pedifer (MBL-HH-29): Stachvlina pedifer (Williams & Lichtwardt Harpellales, Harpellacae) in the
        peritrophic membrane (midgut) of a midge larva (Boreoheptagyia lurida) from turbulent waters of a
        Rocky Mountain stream. The simple, holocarpic thallus of this species, usually with 4 trichospores,
        penetrates through the peritrophic membrane as a means of attachment, an unusual feature in the
        Harpellaceae.
6. Arundinula abyssicola (KU-32): Arundinula abyssicola Van Dover & Lichtwardt (Eccrinales, Eccrinaceae).
        Unbranched thalli producing sporangiospores. From the stomach (foregut) of a galatheid squat lobster
        (Munidopsis subsquamosa) collected at 2600 m depth at the "Rose Garden." One of several hydrothermal
        vent sites in the Galapago Rift where this eccrinid has been found. The fungus has also been collected at a
        hydrothermal vent in the East Pacific Rise.

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Contributed by Jim Anderson:
1. Armillaria rhizomorphs in culture.
2. Armillaria rhizomorphs from wood block.
3. Armillaria fruit bodies.
4. Armillaria fruit bodies.
5. Pleurotus dikaryon -- paried nuclei.
6. Pleurotus clamp connection.
7. Schizophyllumcommune fruit bodies.

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Contributed by Various Sources (as indicated) Supplied by Meredith Blackwell:
I. Fungi and Arthropods:  Some fungi from complex associations with arthropods. These may be parasitic, mutualistic, or often spore dispersal related.
1. Section through the basidioma of the polypore Ganoderma. The pores, some of which are filled with
        basidiospores, are seen in longitudinal section. The large hole was made by a ciid beetle which lays its
        eggs in the polypore. (M. Blackwell)
2. Antennopsis: a minute conidial fungus known only on termites (SEM). (M. Blackwell)
3. Septobasidium: a basidiomycete, parasitizes a few aphids while providing a home for most of the colony.
        (M. Blackwell)
4. Laboulbenia on a legionary ant, Eciton. The many species of Laboulbeniales are obligate parasites of insects,
        mites, and a few millipedes. (M. Blackwell)
5. Pyxidiophora perithecia, one of which (in the center) has exuded the ascospores of a single ascus.
        (M. Blackwell)
6. Pyxyidiophora perithecia. Higher magnification of a perthecium of with ascospores visible at the base of the
        perithicium. (M. Blackwell)
7. Pyxidiophora ascospores. Ascospores of Pyxidiophora species develop a dark holdfast region which attaches to
        mites and insets. The dark spots on the mite are the holdfasts. (M. Blackwell)
8. Anamorphs of Pyxidiophora. Anamorphs of Pyxidiophora developed directly from ascospores on mite ventral
        surface. Notice dark holdfasts and beginning of conidium production. (M. Blackwell)
II. Chytridiomycetes
10. Synchytriumpapillatum infection induces production of a red pigment by the desert plant Erodium cicutarium.
        (R.L. Gilbertson)
11. Rhizophidium on pine pollen. (R.L. Gilbertson)
12. Phlyctochytrium rhizomycelium. (M. Blackwell)
13. Phlyctochytrium zoospores within a zoosporangium. (M. Blackwell)
14. Gametangia of Allomyces. The larger female gametes are being released from one female gametangium; the
        male gametangia are terminal in this species. (M. Blackwell)
15. Resting sporangium of Allomyces. Showing the pitted pigmented cell wall. (M. Blackwell)
III. Ascomycetes
16. Developing asci of Balansia epichloe, an endophyte of grasses. Ascongonial hyphae with crozirs are visible.
        Giemsa stain showing nuclei in deep blue. (J.P. Jones)
17. Young ascus with four of eight ascospores visible in the section (TEM). (C.W. Mims)
18. Ascus slightly older than slide 17. Note thicker ascospore walls (TEM). (C.W. Mims)
19. Ascus with mature ascospores with ornamental walls (TEM). (C.W. Mims)
20. Immature tailed ascospores in an ascus (Echinopodospora). (J.P. Jones)
21. Muriform ascospores at tip of "Jack-in-the-box" ascus (Leptosphaerulina). (M. Blackwell)
22. Sordaria crossover experiment. Results of an experiment on meiotic crossover using ascospore color as a
        genetic marker. (M. Blackwell)
23. Taphrina deformans. Showing early stages of infection of peach leaves; the disease is call peach leaf curl and
        the symptoms are brought about partly by fungus production of plant growth regulators. (J.P. Jones)
24. Cleistothecia of a powdery mildew of lilac leaves. The fungus reproduces asexually until late summer when it
        forms appendaged ascomata. (M. Blackwell)
25. Crushed cleistothecium (as in slide 24). Asci containing four ascospore have been released. (M. Blackwell)
26. Stromata with pertithecia of the fungal endophyte Atkinsonelli on the grass Danthonia. Endophytes grow
        between the plant cells, and some convey insect resistance to the plants. (J.P. Jones)
27. Tuber, a truffle that grows in an obligate association with some tree species. These ascomata
        are derived apothecia of the hypogenan fungus. Cut ascomata show the convoluted hymenial area.
        (J.P. Jones)
28. The Cylindrocarpon asexual stage of Calonectria showing nuclei. ( J.P. Jones)
29. Helicosporium is names for its coiled conidia. (J.P. Jones)
30. Mycelium and developing conidiophores of Aspergillus nidulans (SEM). (C.W. Mims)
31. Nematode trapped by a conidium-producing mycelium. The nematode is held by fungus nooses and eventually
        digested. The fungus thus supplements its nitrogen supply. (E. McGawley)
IV. Basidiomycetes
32. Mycelium of a wood decaying basidiomycete. Notice the droplets of exudate produced by the mycelium. This
        mycelium also produces extracellular enzymes that help to digest the cell walls of the wood.
        (M. Blackwell)
33. Dolipore septum. An elaborate septal pore structure, the dolipore septum, is characteristic of the mycelium of
        most basidiomycetes. (C.W. Mims)
34. Developing basidia and basidiospores. This type of sexual reproduction is the hallmark of the basidiomycetes.
        (C.W. Mims)
35. Amanita muscaria mushrooming through soil beneath a pine tree. These ectomycorrhizal fungi are also known
        for producing hallucinogenic compounds.
36. Ectomycorrhizae formed by a basidiomycete and Helianthanum.
37. Basidiome of the polypore, Laetiporus sulphureus. This fungus decays living trees by selectively degrading
        cellulose from the wood cell walls and leaving behind brown lignin residue. This type of decay is known
        as brown rot. (M. Blackwell)
38. Inonotus dryadeus. Inonotus dryadeus produces golden droplets that appear to have antibiotic activity against
        certain bacteria. This photograph was taken at night when slugs feed upon the basidiome tissue.
        Basidiospores are produced in pores on the underside of this root rot basidiomycete.
39. Rust life cycle. In addition to the more familiar mushrooms and polypores, many other fungi produce basidia.
        One such group is the rust fungi that are parasites of plants. Rusts have complex life cycles, some
        involving two unrelated host plants and a variety of spore types besides basidiospores, as shown in the
        diagram. (C.W. Mims)
40. Urediniospores of a rust (SEM). (C.W. Mims)
41. Mass of rust teliospores (SEM). (C.W. Mims)
42. Higher magnification of rust teliospores in slide 41 (SEM). (C.W. Mims)

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Contributed by Daniel Wubah (Rumen Fungi):
1. Multiflagellate zoospore, Neocallimastix sp.
2. Different types of thalli, Neocallimastix sp.
3. DAPI-stained pair of mature thallus with spherical zoosporangium, Neocallimastix sp.
4. Zoospore release, Neocallimastrix sp.
5. SEM of RS with zoospores attached to the surface.
6. Piromyces communis: A mature thallus with zoosporangium.
7. Orpinomyces sp.: Multiflagellate zoospore.
8a. Orpinomyces sp.: Sessile zoosporangium with erumpent papilla (growing on sisal fiber).
8b. Orpinomyces sp: SEM of empty zoosporangium after release.
9. Caecomyces communis: A mature unisporangiate thallus (endogenous development).
10. Caecomyces communis: A multisporangiate thallus (exogenous development).

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Famous Mycologist Portraits from R.W. Lichtwardt:
1. G. Bresadola
2. A. H. R. Buller
3. J. Dearness
4. H. A. deBary
5. B. O. Dodge
6. H. M. Fitzpatrick
7. H. S. Jackson
8. W. A. Kellerman
9. F. D. Kern
10. D. H. Linder
11. G. W. Martin
12. J. H. Miller
13. W. A. Murrill
14. L. O. Overholts
15. P. A. Saccardo
16. F. K. Sparrow
17. J. A. Steverson
18. Elsie M. Wakefield
19. H. H. Whetzel
20. S. M. Zeller

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Contributed by Fred Rhoades:
1. Hypoxylon multiforme on decaying wood
2. Cordyceps myrmecophila parasitic on carpenter ants
3. Cordyceps myrmecophila parasitic on carpenter ants, closer view
4. Gyromitra californica
5. Lobaria oregana, a canopy-dwelling foliose lichen in old growth conifer forests in the coastal mountains of the
        Pacific northwest USA. Cyanobacterial symbiont is responsible for fixing nitrogen and is present in
        internal cephalodia. Habitat/habit shot of a large thallus (about 1/2 metre long) along a branch of a 200
        year-old Douglas fir, 25 metres above the ground.
6. Lobaria linita, cross section of thallus showing upper cortex, green algal layer, and cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.)
        in cephalodium (duller green below).
7. Ectomycorrhiza, cross section. Russulaceous mycorrhiza on Tsuga heterophylla (western hemlock). Mycorrhiza
        diameter is approximately 1/2 mm. This low magnification view shows the mantel of hyphae surrounding
        the host root.
8. Ectomycorrhiza, cross section, enlarged. This higher magnification shows the Hartig net surrounding cortex
        cells, in one case being sections in "face view" in its position between cells "in front" and "behind" the
        slide.

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Contributed by David Geiser (Electronic Images Only)
I. Ascomycetes
1. Aspergillus nidulans biseriate conidiophore head.
2. Hulle cells, characteristic of the genus Emericella and relatives.
3. Immature asci of Ascobolus, with paraphyses visible.
4. Aspergillus (Eurotium), typical uniseriate conidiophore.
5. Aspergillus sydowii colony -- the cause of sea fan aspergillosis.
6. Plectomycete-like asci of Chaetomium.
7. Cordyceps militaris fertile portion of stroma. Note orange perithecia.
8. Emericella nidulans culture. Cleistothecia are surrounded by a stroma of hülle cells.
9. Eremascus albus hyphae and asci.
10. Cleistothecia of Eupenicillium javanicum.
11. Cleistothecia of Eurotium.
12. Unordered, evanescent asci of Eurotium.
13. Side view of Eurotium ascospore showing two equatorial rings.
14. Eight-spored asci from Gelasinospora.
15. Perithecia of Gelasinospora on agar surface.
16. Perithecia of Gibberella zeae on carnation leaf -- cirrhi are visible.
17. Hypocrea gelatinosa produces eight two-celled ascospores that fragment into 16 part-ascospores.
18. Hypomyces lactifluorum on Russulaceae.
19. Nectria haematococca asci with two-celled ascospores.
20. Nectria haematococca with ruptured perithecium with fascicles of young asci.
21. Nectria tetrasperma: four-spored asci from this pseudohomothallic species.
22. Nectria haematococca perithecia, some producing cirrhi.
        (N. haematococca [a.k.a. Haematonectria haematococca]; Teleomorph of F. solani)
23. Asci from Petriella (Microascaceae). Note the Plectomycete-like, evanescent asci containing
        eight unordered ascospores. Mature ascospores are brick red to brown.
24. Polysporous asci from Podospora on dung.
25. Ascospores of Podospora sp.,  with appendages.
26. Perithecium of Podospora on surface of deer dung.
27. Asci of Sordaria fimicola. Note that each ascus has a refractive apical ring.
28. Stromatic ascoma of Trichocoma paradoxa,  type genus of the Trichocomaceae (Eurotiales).
29. Warcupiella sp.: Note the typical unordered, evanescent asci and ascospores of a eurotialean fungus.
30. Asci of a member of the Xylariales, stained with Melzer’s reagent. Note amyloid ring on ascus apex.
II. Basidiomycetes
31. Calostoma cinnabarina a common stalked puffball in the eastern US.
32. Cantharellus sp.: Note the gill-like folds characteristic of this genus.
33. Tuning fork basidium typical of Dacrymycetales.
34. Gymnosporangium clavipes spermogonial and aecial stages Rosaceae.
        Photo by Gary Moorman
35. Inonotus dryaedus fruiting body enveloping leaves of English ivy.
36. Mutinus caninus mature fruiting bodies and eggs, with fly on spore mucilage.
37. Omphalotus illudens: a large fruiting.
38. Russula spp. basidiocarps.
39. Russuloid spores. Note the amyloid ornamentation of the spores typical of Russulaceae.
III. Slime Molds
40. Arcyria denudata mature sporangia.
41. Arcyria capillitium capillitial threads and spores.
42. Empty calyculi from Hemitrichia (?).
43. Ceratiomyxa sp.: reticulate sporophore form.
44. Dichlaena sp.: irridescent, columellate sporangia (1).
45. Dichlaena sp.: irridescent,  columellate sporangia (2).
46. Dictydiaethalium sp. pseudoaethalium - tightly packed sporangia.
47. Dictydium sp. showing cage-like sporangium.
48. Dictydium sp. showing cage-like sporangium containing spores.
49. Dictyostelium sp. migrating slug stage (1).
50. Dictyostelium sp. migrating slug stage (2)
51. Dictyostelium sp. developing sorocarp.
52. Dictyostelium sp. sorocarp head and spores.
53. Dictyostelium discoideum: top and bottom focus of developing sorocarp.
54. Diderma testaceum sporangia with double peridium (1).
55. Diderma testaceum sporangia with double peridium (2).
56. Hemitrichia sp. sporangia with calyculus.
57. Lycogala sp. aethalium.
58. Physarum cinereum subplasmodiocarpous fruiting on blade of grass.
59. Physarum polycephalum plasmodium on agar.
60. Physarum polycephalum sporangia.
61. Physarum polycephalum gellified and fluid portions of plasmodium.
62. Physarum polycephalum plasmodium overrunning a colony of Penicillium.
63. Stemonitis sp. sporangia.
64. Stemonitis sp. showing columella and capillitium.
65. Trichia sp. sporangia.
66. Trichia flavogenia sporangia.
67. Trichia flavogenia capillitium and spores (1).
68. Trichia flavogenia capillitium and spores (2).

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